Tag Archives: healthy crowdfunder

Equity Crowdfunding Wakes Up Goliath

TMX-PM-logo-b-EN-300x126

crowdfunding-secondary-marketLast year on June 19, 2013, we hosted our first crowdfunding meetup called  “Crowdfunding Reinvents the Old Stock Exchange” and late adopters ignored the equity crowdfunding word. Not this past week.

You know crowdfunding is going mainstream when the:

  1.  TMX Group, Canada’s most senior stock exchange recognizes crowdfunding as competition in its latest Management Discussion and Analysis (MD&A) for fiscal year 2013.
  2.  TMX Group  has announced they are operating a private marketplace following  NASDAQ OMX announcement on March 6th.
  3.  US SEC and FINRA are finally processing the public comments for the JOBS Act Title III which will effectively legalize crowd investing by non-accredited investors to virtually all kinds of private businesses through the internet.
  4.  Ontario Securities Commission  and other provincial securities regulator  joined the stampede this past week inviting the public to comment on their proposed crowdfunding rules until June 18, 2014.
  5.  Venture capitalists have injected more capital into equity funding platforms CircleUp $14 million   and Realty Mogul $9 million.

 

Furthermore, the US JOBS Act will facilitate a pipeline of companies remaining private until mature enough to go public

 

  1. Title II (after 80 years) finally allows businesses to solicit or advertise fund raising to accredited investors using various social media and traditional marketing channels.
  2.  Title IV Regulation A+ will allow companies raise up to $50 million “ lite IPO” or mini registration  and Title V will increase shareholder count from 500 to 2,000 before becoming a reporting issuer. See earlier blog Crowdfunding Is Better Than You Think

 

So what do all these news mean to you?

If you are an Investor

 Accredited or non-accredited, angels, other high net worth (HNW), or institutional investor, start looking for funding platforms that:

  • conducts a comprehensive due diligence and vetting of businesses using its platform
  • places a high priority on investor protection at optimal costs
  • recruits proven management with appropriate skill sets to partner with issuers
  • facilitates liquidity paths for investors prior to the bigger exit
  • experienced in best practices in corporate governance and investor relations with publicly listed companies
  • managed by people aligned with investors’ interest through co-investment

If you are a startup or early revenue stage business

While making your company investor ready, start looking for funding platforms that:

  • places a high priority on educating the non-accredited investors on the various risks associated with a particular business before investing
  • works with your management like partners from funding to exit
  • encourages global syndication or collaboration with other platforms so you succeed in raising capital faster
  • prepares your company to graduate to more senior capital exchanges

At Healthy Crowdfunder we are committed to the highest standards and best practices applied in the public capital markets at optimal costs.

 

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Top 10 Reasons Investors May Invest in Your Startup

By Antonio A Arias

ashton-kutcher-nyse

Raising capital is a work of art and science. You cannot do one without the other or neither one is more important than the other. It is logic and emotion combined. Other investors have their criteria, I have mine because I have gone through it myself at different stages in my career as a professional business manager in the corporate world and as an entrepreneur. If you are raising capital, it is imperative you understand the investment criteria of your investor targets.

  1. Exit strategy –  you have exited before or you have a clear pathway to exit to return investors’ money with capital gains by a certain time.
  2. Market Problem – you have a huge underserved market with a chronic pain.
  3. Team – you have an extraordinary management team with the tract record and the killer instinct to win its sector.
  4. Product – you have a solution(s) to relieve your customers’ pains; not a solution looking for a problem
  5. Price – You have priced your product where the benefits far outweigh its cost.
  6. Competition – your team and your product possess unmatched competitive edge.
  7. Mission – you lead a mission driven company aligned with values striking a balance of social and financial returns.
  8. Relationship – you build and nurture a longer term relationship with all stakeholders – customers, employees, investors, and partners.
  9. Ownership – investors are aligned with your mission and proud to be part owners or passive partners of your business.
  10. Accelerator – you graduated from an accelerator or incubator group, or have core advisors that are market leaders.

If you are an investor or an entrepreneur what is most important to you and why? Your comments are much appreciated.

 

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Crowdfunding Course 101 in British Columbia?

By Antonio A Arias and Joy Case

KnowledgeSince the announcement of the JOBS Act in April 2012, we have hosted speaking events,  crowdfunding meetups and webinars focused on the why and what of crowdfunding.  After months of discussions with a recognized institution in British Columbia, we are now drafting a course outline.

Crowdfunding/ crowdsourcing is definitely going main stream.  On October 23, 2013, the US SEC regulators tabled the JOBS Act Title III proposed crowdfunding rules for public comment. In Canada each provincial securities regulators are jockeying up for the leadership position while awaiting a national holistic solution. Saskatchewan was first off the gate yesterday (Dec.6, 2013) when it legalized crowdfunding to non-accredited investors.

To offer courses, the challenge is who to please first. Our objective is to educate three principal audiences with respect to time savings and financial gains:

  1. small and medium size businesses (SMEs),
  2. investors, and
  3. professional service providers.

With technology advances, we can do more with less time, save money, and gain more revenues.

What is it about technology that changes everything?

Answer: It is all in the proprietary technology, which we will cover during the course. For those innovative early adopters, you are already experiencing it. We would like you to be our special guests too.

Our introductory course will be focused on the how to of  presales and equity crowdfunding.

We are targeting the following audience for these reasons:

Target Audience Reasons
Entrepreneurs contemplating on test marketing or preselling their prototypes. Portals are a good starting point to test market your minimum viable product (MVP) at lower investment costs.
Entrepreneurs contemplating equity crowdfunding Equity financing involves all business school disciplines: marketing (IR/PR, social/traditional media), finance/accounting, securities law, human resources, psychology/sociology, arts and science, among others.
Investors – speculators, strategic, angels, venture capitalists, private equity funds,  institutional Financing ecosystem will converge from angel, VC, PE, secondary trading, all the way to liquidity events by M&A or going public.Information technology has created a flatter world. If we break down silos or information gatekeepers dividing investor groups, we can all profit more efficiently.
Securities regulators, securities lawyers Technology replaces archaic systems and still provides protective measures to investors while facilitating capital flow.
Professional  service providers (finance/analysts/ accountants, marketing IR/PR social media, securities lawyers) Understand how technology has made our jobs so much easier and how you can provide more value added services to clients.
Traditionalists Technology does not replace everything but enhances our productivity.  Find out how it complements your current practices.

Call to Action:

Here are our draft Learning Outcomes (Duration: Two six hour Saturday sessions)

  1. Understand the 4 types of crowdfunding; historical and current practices
  2. Understand how technology has enhanced financing and marketing practices
  3. Identify and analyse best practices for successful crowdfunding campaigns
  4. Gain experience producing and marketing video for investment pitches
  5. Research and analyse social media marketing and public relations for campaigns
  6. Understand how crowdfunding and crowdsourcing  are used as market research and predictive analytics
  7. Integrating online and offline finance and marketing practices

We plan to host a series of courses and your inputs will allow us to deliver a better service.  If you identify yourself as one of the above audiences, what would you like to learn from our introductory crowdfunding course?

Your comments or inquiries are valuable to us. Please contact us through this blog or via our Twitter handles; @HealthVCFunder for Antonio and @FundItTV for Joy.

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Healthy Crowdfunder Collaborates with British Columbia Investment Capital Branch

bc

To Offer 30% Tax Credit to New BC Investors 

Vancouver, British Columbia – Healthy Crowdfunder Corp (“HCC”) is pleased to announce that the Company has been registered (Registration No. 30965) as an Eligible Business Corporation (EBC) under section 28.2 of The Province of British Columbia’s Small Business Venture Capital Act.

The Equity Authorization will allow HCC to raise equity capital directly from eligible Investors   who are BC residents or taxable corporations. Individuals who purchase shares of HCC are eligible to receive a refundable tax credit equal to 30% of their investment amount, up to a maximum of $60,000 in credits per taxation year. Corporations may only deduct the tax credits from their BC taxes otherwise payable under the BC Income Tax Act. There is no annual limit on the tax credit for corporations; however, the credits are non-refundable.

The 30% tax credits are offered on a first come – first serve basis, as part of a limited government allocation and it is expected that they will be fully allocated by the end of October 2013. Investments in Healthy Crowdfunder are also fully RRSP eligible.  A BC resident investing $10,000 and transferring the securities to his RRSP at the top marginal rate is saving $7,370 for a net investment of $2,630.

InvestmentRRSP deduction at 43.7% marginal rate

Tax refund at 30%

$10,000

(4,370)

(3,000)

Total tax savingsNet investment at risk

7,370

$2,630

CEO Antonio Arias noted: “The BC Venture Capital Act is a progressive program allowing us to develop and offer our crowdfunding and crowdsourcing services to the huge healthcare ventures in the US and Canada. The completion of the platform will facilitate the introduction of members – health ventures, investors, service providers, and customers – resulting in more efficient flow of capital and other resources. Technology is advancing at exponential rate. The traditional ways of doing business are being replaced by more intelligent and economic systems delivering faster results. Various sectors in healthcare market can benefit the most as the world’s ageing population continues to rise.”

We are very grateful to Rachelle Kallechy, Portfolio Manager and Jeff Lindsay, Executive Director of the BC Investment Capital Branch for all their efforts to qualify us for this special program of the Ministry of International Trade. When authorized for $1 Million, it is akin to the BC government investing $300,000 towards technology business and job creations. One of our plans is to develop an accelerator in Vancouver similar to RockHealth (San Francisco) and StartUp Health (New York).

Watch Premier Christy Clark as she inspires us to dream about our country.

About Healthy Crowdfunder Corp

www.healthycrowdfunder.com

Healthy Crowdfunder Corp is a privately held technology company which is being launched to develop a platform linking members such as health ventures, investors, service providers, and customers to advance the development and commercialization of preventive, predictive and personalized (“3Ps”) health solutions. With the advent of crowdsourcing and crowdfunding arising from technological advancements, HCC will address the 3Ps of the $3 trillion healthcare market by creating an ecosystem where the members can collaborate and operate expeditiously to the benefit of all health consumers.

Watch Premier Christy Clark as she inspires us to dream about our country  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VX4HgLUyJaY

About The Small Business Venture Capital Act

http://www.jtst.gov.bc.ca/ICP/VCP/index.htm

To claim BC Venture Capital Tax Credit

Venture capital programs encourage investors to make equity capital investments in British Columbia small businesses that will enhance and diversify the provincial economy.  The government recognizes that creating new small businesses and expanding existing ones will contribute to a healthy economy.  These programs give small business continuous access to early-stage venture capital to help them develop and expand.

 

Contact Information:

Healthy Crowdfunder Corp

Antonio A Arias

Chief Executive Officer

T: 1+ 650-319-7418  | 1+ 778-889-8509

E: tarias@alamidascapital.com

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Crowdfunding Is Better Than You Think

President Obama signs JOBS ActExtracted from Forbes, October 8, 2013

The JOBS Act Isn’t All ‘Crowdfunding’

By Chris Brummer & Daniel Gorfine

On September 23, the SEC officially implemented Title II of the JOBS Act by lifting a decades-old ban on the mass marketing of private securities offerings – meaning those securities not formally registered with the SEC.  This has triggered enormous excitement in startup and small business communities as entrepreneurs consider ways to raise funds through newly available capital-raising tools.  But even with the increased media coverage and interest, there is still a good deal of confusion about what portion of the law went ‘live,’ and how this portion relates to other provisions in the legislation.

Much of the confusion can be tied to the habit of conflating different aspects of the JOBS Act and calling it all “crowdfunding.”  The fact is that the JOBS Act tackles access to capital in a number of distinct ways, each with its own set of opportunities, risks, and questions.  And while the law includes aspects related to use of the Internet and social media – elements that most people associate with crowdfunding – large sections are also focused on creating new opportunities for wealthier investors and private capital markets.  Understanding these distinctions is critical for entrepreneurs and investors alike.  To help, here’s a quick primer on the more prominent features of the JOBS Act.

  • Crowdfunding.  Let’s start with the term ‘crowdfunding.’  Crowdfunding refers to the process by which capital is raised for a project, venture, or enterprise through the pooling of numerous and relatively small financial contributions or investments from the public, usually via the internet.  Donation-based or ‘non-financial-return’ crowdfunding is already in existence and has been made popular by platforms such as Indiegogo and Kickstarter.  While the success of this non-investment model certainly inspired some of the thinking driving the JOBS Act, it is important to note that this kind of crowdfunding is not directly impacted by the law. For the sake of clarity, let’s call donation-based or non-financial-return models: crowdfunding.
  • Title I of the JOBS Act: the IPO On-Ramp for ‘Emerging Growth Companies.’  The first part of the JOBS Act deals with companies looking to go public through an initial public offering (IPO).  In response to a trend of declining IPOs over the past few decades, Congress created special rules for so-called “emerging growth companies” (EGC) – defined as a company with less than $1 billion in revenues over the past fiscal year – whereby the company would be exempt, or at least partially exempt, for a period of time from certain disclosures that were thought to deter companies from choosing to go public.  An EGC is also permitted to file a confidential IPO registration statement with the SEC that must be made public at least 21 days before it begins actively promoting the sale of its offering, and can ‘test the waters’ with certain qualified buyers to gauge interest in the offering.  This is all intended to jumpstart a laggard IPO market, especially for small companies.  This provision went ‘live’ with the legislation, and is what Twitter is relying on for its planned IPO.  This portion of the law can be referred to as: the IPO On-Ramp.
  • Title II of the JOBS Act: General Solicitation and Accredited Investors.  The second part of the JOBS Act is what has been drawing attention in recent days due to significant changes in rules governing certain private offerings.  Historically, a Regulation D, Rule 506 offering has been exempt from SEC registration provided that the offering is not publicly advertised and that the purchasers are largely qualified institutions or “accredited” investors – those whose net worth is greater than $1 million (excluding a primary residence) or whose individual income exceeded $200,000 ($300,000 for couples) for the past two years with the expectation for that level of income to continue in the current year.  Title II of the JOBS Act called for the SEC to lift the ban on mass marketing these offerings, provided that the issuer reasonably believes and has taken reasonable steps to verify that the buyers of the private securities are in fact accredited.  Unlike Title I, this portion of the law required the SEC to issue final rules before going ‘live.’  September 23 was the day that the SEC’s new rules went into effect lifting the ban, and providing parameters as to how an issuer might go about verifying the status of investors.  Notably, the SEC also has issued newproposed rules that would impose additional filing and disclosure requirements for those issuers taking advantage of general solicitation, but these rules have not been finalized or put into effect.  Let’s call this portion of the law: 506(c) investing.
  • Title III of the JOBS Act: Public Securities Crowd Investing.  This next part of the JOBS Act is probably what the law is best known for: legalizing securities crowd investing.  More specifically, a company can raise up to $1 million within a 12 month period from the general public through a broker-dealer or ‘funding portal’ website.  Investors are subject to annual investment caps based on their income or wealth, and there are investor education requirements, as well as limits on general advertising.  This portion of the law also requires SEC rulemaking before it can ‘go live.’ The SEC is now nine months late on issuing new rules, although the prevailing expectation based on Commission statements is that proposed rules will be out this fall.  Nevertheless, until final rules are issued, securities crowd investing is not permitted.  Instead, only close cousin 506(c) investing is available to a limited percentage of the population.  For the sake of clarity, let’s differentiate between non-financial-return or donation-based ‘crowdfunding,’ Title II 506(c) investing, and Title III: crowd investing.
  • Title IV of the JOBS Act: Regulation A+.  This next title of the JOBS Act potentially increases the attractiveness of another securities registration exemption.  Regulation A has permitted the sale of securities to both accredited and unaccredited investors so long as the issuer files a mini-registration with the SEC and complies with relevant state law requirements in each state where funds are solicited.  One online issuer, Fundrise, has used this exemption to raise money from investors in Washington, D.C. and Virginia for a local commercial real estate project.  Title IV of the JOBS Act increases the offering limit from $5 million to $50 million in a 12-month period, requires that certain filings be provided to investors, and provides for annual audited financial statements.  This portion of the law requires SEC rulemaking before going live, which has to date not yet occurred.  For the sake of clarity, lawyers and wonks tend to call this portion of the law: Reg A+ investing.
  • Title V of the JOBS Act: Private Companies Stay Private Longer.  This final portion of the JOBS Act raises the threshold on the number of shareholders a company can have before it is subject to Exchange Act annual reporting requirements (e.g. a 10-Q or 10-K).  Previously, a private company could remain private until it reached 500 shareholders.  Title V changes this limit to 2,000 shareholders, or 500 shareholders who are unaccredited.  In combination with Title II of the JOBS Act, this change means that many private companies may be able to raise more money privately and remain private longer than in the past.  On the one hand this may potentially be in conflict with the goals of the IPO on-ramp, though on the other hand this may help facilitate a pipeline of companies mature enough to confidently enter public markets.

While the above explanation of some of the key provisions of the JOBS Act is by no means exhaustive, it is intended to shed light on key distinctions in the law.  It is critical that market participants understand these distinct capital-raising tools and related risks and opportunities.  And remember, the JOBS act isn’t just “crowdfunding,” but a heck of a lot more.

Chris Brummer is a professor of law at Georgetown University and a Senior Fellow at the Milken Institute; Daniel Gorfine is the Washington-based Director of Financial Markets Policy & Legal Counsel for the Milken Institute.  Direct link to Forbes article

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Curated by Antonio Ariston Arias, CEO & Co-Founder Healthy Crowdfunder Corp

Wharton Study Finds Crowdfunders Act Similar to VCs

Join us tackle healthcare issues - one of top 8 priorities of AnIdeaNation

Join us tackle healthcare issues – one of top 8 priorities of AnIdeaNation

On the eve of September 23, 2013, a historic day for all of us waiting for this 80 year old Securities Act of 1930s,  it is timely to reprint a study by Wharton professor Ethan Mollick who found that the sophisticated crowd can be as competent and even less biased than the traditional venture capitalists. For the uninformed, tomorrow is a milestone day when the US Securities Exchange Commission lifts the ban on general solicitation to accredited investors only. Welcome to the flat world of finance and marketing. As entrepreneurs, we envision better times ahead.

Highlights of  his findings:

1. Entrepreneurs who demonstrate a history of successful projects or ventures are more likely to be crowdfunded.

2. Entrepreneurs who demonstrate third party endorsements are more likely to be crowdfunded – social proof.

Comments: We have to start with our innermost circle of friends and influence. If the people who know us intimately cannot even support us, we have lots of work to do, before even reaching out to total strangers.

3. It is partially true that entrepreneurs who demonstrate preparedness are more likely to be crowdfunded.

Comments: We emphasize the importance of premarketing, investor relations, and/or public relations work prior to the actual fund raising event. Winning customers or investors is a relationship building exercise. It starts long before we ask for other people’s money either to buy our products or invest in our ventures. It is about building trust and credibility that we will deliver as we say we will.

4. Selected projects are less geographically concentrated in crowdfunding than in venture capital. VC-funded project typically happens in start-up clusters at 70 miles average distance to VCs.

Comments: Hello Silicon Valley, you now have competition with beautiful Vancouver, the land of eternal optimists, health afficionados, yogis, runners, skiers and/or organic food consumers. Crowdfunding is immune to the cluster effect of San Francisco, Boston, or New York. With strong protective but less costly investor protection measures and feature friendly equity platforms for entrepreneurs, the world is indeed flat.

5. Gender is less predictive of selection in crowdfunding than in venture capital.

Comments: Not only is the world flatter, crowdfunding is indeed unisex. Certain studies have found women make for better CEOs or leaders. What about we  immigrants who came to North America just like the early pioneers that left Europe? Crowdfunding  breaks down all political, cultural, or ideological boundaries. At Healthy Crowdfunder, the market we serve will all benefit from the health ventures we support, regardless of creed, race, countries, age, and the list goes on as we destroy biases of dated monarchies. It is not surprising to see so much resistance to crowdfunding in certain circles. It is a battle for survival for ancient fiefdoms. The roadblock is not the SEC. It is the secret powers behind closed doors trying to assert their final control.

Click here to read Professor Mollick’s  Wharton Study Finds Crowdfunders Act Similar to VCs.

Your comments are welcome. Feel free to connect with me Twitter @alamidas.

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September 22, 2013 · 1:02 pm

Where is the VC industry heading? 5 latest trends

world is flatCheck out this blog by Balazs Szabo  – Where is the VC industry heading? 5 latest trends.

With crowdfunding, starting with accredited investors, we are reinventing the venture capital model. The private and public company exchanges or platforms will just be mini stock exchanges of niche markets.

Efficiency, processing speed, transparency, and open culture will render all gatekeepers of information and old schools as relics worth more for the museums of tomorrow.

 

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